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20130204
20130212
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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
him the most important person in the mix this week in the vice president spoke about foreign policy challenges at the munish security conference. >> we have made it clear at the outset that we would not-- we would be prepared to me bilaterally with the irani leadership. we would not make it a secret that we were doing that. we would let our partners know if that occasion presented itself. that offer stands. nearly all of our partners and allies are convinced that president assad is a tyrant, hell-bent on clinging to power, is no longer fit to lead the syrian people and he must go. >> as well as syria and iran the united states faces new challenges from islammix extremism in african, yet it is not clear they are ready to stand on their own by 2014 when u.s. troops are scheduled to withdraw. and great power politics are on the a lend-- agenda again. china is confident, insertive in the south china sea in relations about moskow have cooled. all of this with a troubled economy at home and calls for a lighter footprint abroad. i'm pleased to have tom donilon back at this table. welcome.
and its impact on neighboring countries. then, a look at foreign policy challenges facing the obama administration. after that, a discussion about the state of women's rights around the world. >> if you have some hotshot who just got his phd in computer science from stanford, she is getting offers from all over the world. to say you can stay in some limbo for six years, that is not really competitive. >> congress can do a lot. you do not have to be efficient on your iphone or blackberry to understand the application of policy and what makes it work and does not. >> it is very difficult to make investment decisions and expect any kind of return on investment when you have no way to predict the future. our difficulty right now is that there is no consistency or certainty in in our policy decisions. >> the government's role in technology and policy, from this years ces international consumer electronics show. monday night on the communicators on c-span2. >> at age 65, she was the oldest first lady when her husband became president. she never set foot in washington. her husband, benjami
romney, just the economy. not foreign policy or social issues, very focused. the republican establishment loved that, crossroads spent 300 million-dollar and they lost. let the republicans and conservatives of the country run campaigns. >> and crossroads will spend tens of millions of more dollars in 2014 supporting more establishment candidates against people like todd aiken, murdock in indiana. how does this fit together? >> let me rise above the partisan bickering here. and let us reason together. i think one way that you can unite the party, which has had major success in integrating the more populous elements is agree on the buckley rule. people will try to support and nominate the most conservative candidate who can win. if you don't try to make statements by nominating extreme conservatives who can be sort of enjoyable and outside the populous but have no chance of winning in a general election, you don't go that way. classic example, delaware senate 2010. they threw away a seat. they would have had a moderate. a semi-liberal republican but this beats a hard line liberal democrat a
the weapons. >> you delivered a major foreign policy today at the heritage foundation. well thought out speech on national security issues. why now? why did you decide to do it? because you knew that it was going to jump-start the speculation you want to establish foreign policy credentials for a possible run in 2016. >> you know, i just joined the foreign relations committee. i wanted to spell out what my mission is for the foreign policy. it's a unique position and one that needs to be expressed. we often have two polar extremes and really just one, for the most part, that we're everywhere you will a of the time. the other extreme is that it would be nowhere any of the time and that would be isolationism. there's a realistic approach somewhere in the middle and it would involve containment. i talked a lot about george kennan who may be the most famous diplomats, thought to be one of the chief architects of containment and i think there's some of ththat may apply to rad islam. it's an thet cal to freedom and has to be opposed at various parts around the world but i don't think the standard ap
to kiss up to the americans. you don't have to follow the mubarak foreign policy record. you can actually do your own thing and iranian regime is seeing an opportunity to have a hand in bringing egypt in on their team. melissa: so how do you think that plays out? if they go in and offer the them the exact same support, who would they choose? >> well it depends on exactly how they want to go forward. remember the shoe throwing. what does that symbolize? at the core you have clerics also in egypt and morsi regime is obviously muslim brotherhood. they are very religious. they don't see the geopolitical advances here as a priority. they might see the sunni, shiite rivalry being more important. this trip was a slap in the face to the u.s. who is offering all this help to egypt there is also, the clerics have been repicking ahmadinejad and iranian regime you can't extend this shiite agenda throughout the region. melissa: we're not super popular there either. >> no, we're not. melissa: i don't know, are we necessarily anymore popular? >> this is the wake-up call for the americans, the u.s. admin
that i began in 1976 to galvanize african-american opinion on foreign-policy issues, particularly issues that concern the black world, u.s. policy towards africa, the caribbean and latin america. so transafrica of course was the organization that used its incher mentalities to galvanize american opposition to apartheid and with the embassy arrests that we were able to organize the arrest of 5000 people and in the 1980s and 1984 and the next year, and with that working with members of congress. we won the support for the set of sanctions that president reagan vetoed and his veto was overridden by a republican-controlled senate excess of the work we did and the millions we organized to make a difference. that, coupled with the great work that was being done in south africa led to a new africa that we see today. but we have been doing that work over a period of time. i had been there 25 years when i stepped down. >> host: who are maxey and doris robinson? >> guest: maxie robinson was my father and doris robinson was my mother. and i have already introduced you to them. they had strong opini
dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect? yes or no. >> my reference to the -- >> are you going to answer the question, senator hagel? the question is, were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. >> well -- >> i would like the answer whether you were right or wrong, and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer on a lot of things today. >> well, let the record show you refuse to answer that question. >> ana, the viewers may not know the history between hagel and mccain. they were close friends in 2000. not so in 2008 when it was clear that hagel's wife was supporting obama and not mccain. was that personal? >> i don't think so at all. anybody who ever saw mccain grill donald rumsfield knows that this is john mccain. this is his job. they are there to advise and consent, not to rubber stamp. if they are not going to get the scrutiny and tough questions now, then when? >> why was he so much tougher on chuck hagel than john kerry? >> because there are so many inconsistenci
an islamist president. there was talk that maybe these two countries would unite and craft foreign policy against washington and the west. that really hasn't happened because on key issues, they still differ. syria, for example. iran backs the assad regime, egypt doesn't. saudi arabia and gulf states, egypt is friends with these countries, iran is not. so for these reasons and more, many expect a cordial relationship between iran and egypt but not one where they are best friends. erin? >>> now to england, where the positive identification of king richard iii's skeletal remains has triggered a resurgence of interest in the notorious monarch. what would he have done if he lived in the era of twitter? richard quest is in london. i asked him to explain how the long dead ruler is getting a royal makeover. >> reporter: erin, this is the portrait most familiar of richard iii but this is the recreation from the scans of the skull that was found in that parking lot in middle england. note the tightness of the skin and the way artists have put the hair and the reality to it. it was commissioned by
. anything anybody is upset about in foreign policy, or domestic policy or taxes or spending, even though there are other people in the administration that are going to take the hit for it or some of the blame should go to congress the president is going to take that hit with the voting public. did not cost him re-election, but it doesn't surprise me that someone like hillary clinton, who has now gone to retirement, and, you know, the blow of that already is there for her, was there for her before she left, i'm not surprised at all by that, jon. jon: it's my understanding you're in key west today, is that right? >> yes, i am. jon: take off your necktie, man. >> i came out of vacation to be with you guys, and i'm sorry for the snow that is coming your way. jon: we appreciate you showing up for work, playing with pain. while we're getting a blizzard joe trippi is down in key west with a necktie on, his self be imposed torture. thank you so much. jenna: he showed up as you point out and he did apologize for being there, and we accept. jon: always count on joe. jenna: we certainly do. her run
't know. idon't develop the programs, don't develop policy, i don't do foreign policy or military policy or military objectives. once congress and the executive branch decide what the policy or program is, then we see how well it's done and if there are problems, we make recommendations. going back to the taxation issue, it's a critical issue. now the afghan government, what they collect is about $2 billion per year. just paying for the afghan national security force is over $4 billion. then and all the other programs. the problem is there's a delta between what the afghans collect and it cost of running their government, the cost of fighting the taliban, the cost of maintaining order. that difference is being supported by the united states taxpayer and by our allies. but it is conditioned. the caller and others have some concerns about how well that is being spent. that is the value. a lot of discussion came out of the tokyo accords about the international community will not walk, but they're trying to put conditions on the ability of the afghan government to govern and to fight corrupt
that you look up the article that was written on gentry 17th in the foreign policy magazine about egis at the kabul industry and the problems that have already surfaced about them. now i have talked to patrick kennedy about this and his staff has come over and briefed by staff that they believe it is doing just fine. the end of this i have to tell you the umbrella contract for the high level security in the sea is a 10 billion-dollar contract over five years and i won't go into the report of the background check but it's $100 -- $100 million a year. i can't believe we can't use the marines in these situations. somebody has got to do cost-benefit analysis. all that i told you. can you imagine in the money that we spent fooling around with these contractors the were not getting the job done can you imagine the time we spend and the money that has been spent? i would like for you to talk about the cost benefits of putting marines on the embassy's when we are in contingencies and why this is so hard to get our arms around and how are we saving any money? >> welcome a senator, just to react
of the polls said that basically people felt that democrats were the stronger party in foreign policy and stronger party in keeping, you know, america safe and terrorism. we've never seen that before. republicans have always won on those measures. whether or not it's the reality on the ground and you can point to each country it does seem to be a perception out there that this party is doing something to keep america safe. >> the perceptions change and perceptions clearly change when suddenly we discovered that in libya and in egypt we were not as beloved as president obama would have had us-- would have had us believe because he gave a beautiful speech in cairo. in fact, our popularity ratings in many of those countries. >> going back five years. >> are lower than they were under the last-- >> going back five years. >> under george w. bush. >> you're five years old on that statement. >> this is another perfect example. we supported what was supposed to be a freedom agenda in egypt and what do we have? we have a muslim brotherhood taking over. >> and mubarak in office a better move? a
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)